Category Archives: Business

What You Enjoy

18th February 2016

These bits of Jocelyn K. Glei’s interview of Sebastian Thrun had me nodding:

“…imagine that you are already successful. You’ve looked into the future, and you’ve succeeded. What would you enjoy doing today given that knowledge?”

“The data shows that people who are rich aren’t any happier, so you might as well derive your happiness from what you are doing today.”

I Can Bring Home the Bacon, Why Are You So Interested in the Pan?

23rd September 2015

Margaret Stewart — who some of you many remember from the Mighty Closet feature I did with her one million years ago — has some solid suggestions for speakers, organizers, and interviewers about how to ease onstage sexism at conferences: What My Uterus Can Teach You About Being a Tech Leader. It’s a good read, have a look.

I’d also add, if you’re balancing genders in a speaker lineup, avoid having more than one woman at your conference speak to the issue of harassment (unless that’s the topic of your gathering of course). That interests me to a point, but taken too far, especially at tech conferences, it can be exhausting and disheartening. It puts women in the spotlight not for their accomplishments, but as the object of threats from a mostly male chorus.

Good Copy

21st May 2014

This anti-shoplifting sign made me want to bring in something from home and leave it on the shelf for them to sell.

Humin Beta

24th April 2014

Update: I’m out of invites, but if you’d like to join the beta you can request an invite direct from Humin.

My friend Lane Wood, who spoke at Camp Mighty last year, is helping make an app I think you’ll want. It’s called Humin, and it takes the contacts section of your phone and adds some of the info and functionality of a social media platform. So now my contacts look like this:

Humin pulls down a photo, employment background, any meetings you have on your calendar with this person, mutual friends, work experience and common friends at those companies, and educational background. I’ve learned a lot I didn’t know about friends, just by opening my phone to call them, and Humin has even alerted me a couple of times when friends are in from out of town. So neat.

I’ve found it indispensable enough that I replaced my contacts app with Humin, so now I make all my texts and calls through the app. It’s exponentially more useful, and frankly prettier, than my old contacts.

If you’d like to try it, request an invitation to the beta right here, and I’ll email you one. Let me know what you think.

The Best Parts of Strengths Finder 2.0 by Tom Rath

10th April 2014

I found Strengths Finder and its online component very useful. The book introduction outlines an overall philosophy on effort, and then has a chapter covering thirty-four strengths they’ve identified through research. Each chapter gives an overview of the strengths and then offers ideas for action.

You can read the whole book, like I did, or take an online quiz to show which strengths are yours so you can focus on those.

Overarching points:

“…people have several times more potential for growth when they invest energy in developing their strengths instead of correcting their deficiencies.”

“The key to human development is building on who you already are.”

“Most successful people start with a dominant talent — and then add skills, knowledge, and practice to the mix. When they do this, the raw talent actually serves as a multiplier.”

Sample text from a strengths chapter:

INPUT

Sample information: “If you like to travel, it is because each new location offers novel artifacts and facts. These can be acquired and then stored away… who knows when they might become useful?”

Sample action item: “As you gather and absorb information, be aware of the individuals and groups that can most benefit from your knowledge, and be intentional about sharing with them.”

I found the book valuable mostly because some of the best decisions I’ve made have come from following what felt like the path of least resistance. But that can also feel like a cop out, because I have a lot of internal voices saying, “Overcome your weaknesses! Be a better you!” And so forth. The truth is, the you you’ve got is just fine. Work with those raw materials instead of fighting your nature, and you make more progress.

I have a friend who makes hiring decisions based on the philosophies in this book. I’m curious about whether any of you have done it, and whether you found it useful.

How to Build a Creative Brand

10th April 2014

Have you heard of Creative Bug? They make beautiful craft classes and video workshops, and their team made that crazy CRUSH yarn wall at our Go Mighty ALT party:

I know lots of you are small business owners, and right now Creative Bug is offering a 5-week course on Building a Creative Brand. It features coursework by Heather Ross and Lisa Congdon, who spoke at the first Camp Mighty, among others.

The class is regularly $175, but you can get it for $125:

Enter the code BRAND
And boom, $50 off.

Score.

This post is in partnership with Creativebug, which was built by people I like. Hi, guys.